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1- PhD Student, Department of Architecture, Faculty of Architecture and Urban Planning, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran, Iran
2- Associate Professor, Department of Architecture, Faculty of Architecture and Urban Planning, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran, Iran , mahdinejad@sru.ac.ir
Abstract:   (538 Views)

The running intellectuals that prevailed during each age, has always influenced the architecture of that period. To understand these influences more deeply, creating a meaningful relationship between the architecture and urban planning of each period with the prevailing ideas of that period can be effective. Safavid period as one of the most brilliant periods in the history of Iran, is also not exempt from this rule. Therefore, it is worthwhile to examine the ideas that led to the flourishing of this period. In this period there have been three streams of thought indicator. These currents of thought (Shia, Ishraq and mysticism) on the architecture and urbanism of this era have also affected gardens and palaces and Chaharbagh Avenue reaching innovations. Isfahan school is used to rise philosophical, theological and art activities during the 17th and early 18th centuries in Isfahan and established principles and rules in architecture and urbanism. In fact, this school was formed under the attention of Safavid king and creativity of the architects of this period, and led to differentiate the architecture of this period from prior periods.
This paper tries to survey gardens and palaces and also in macro level such as chaharbagh avenue in safavid era in isfahan in Isfahan school relying on texts and historical documents and evidence that remains of that era answering this question that the what is the connection between Isfahan school and architecture and urban planning and what is the representation of the principles of this school in gardens, palaces and macro level (Chaharbagh street, city). Research findings indicate that the architecture and urbanism of the Safavid era and an index of gardens and palaces and avenues of it rooted in the principles that current in that era (Isfahan school).

     

✅ The running intellectuals that prevailed during each age, has always influenced the architecture of that period. To understand these influences more deeply, creating a meaningful relationship between the architecture and urban planning of each period with the prevailing ideas of that period can be effective. Safavid period as one of the most brilliant periods in the history of Iran, is also not exempt from this rule. Therefore, it is worthwhile to examine the ideas that led to the flourishing of this period.
 


Type of Study: Research | Subject: History of architecture and urban planning
Received: 2021/01/14 | Accepted: 2021/05/5

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